Michael Mosley: How women can lose 1 stone in 12 weeks with no dieting

This Morning: Michael Mosley discusses 800 calorie diet

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Dr Michael Mosley has helped thousands lose weight and transform their lives. But for those who really struggle with a traditional diet, the expert has revealed the one easy way to shed pounds without really noticing. All that has to be done is adjusting the time you eat. 

Dr Michael has several diets which people can follow to try and lose weight; The Very Fast 800, The New 5:2 and Way of Life. 

But there is one simple change everyone can make which could see big results on your waistline; eating earlier in the evening. 

He previously explained how being a working parent saw him eating his dinner “well after 9pm”. 

“More recently, we’ve made an effort to start eating our dinner by 7.30pm, as well as avoiding too many late-night snacks,” he added

Dr Michael went onto reveal why this was “good for the waistline”. 

He commented on a recent study from the University of Nottingham and Tehran University of Medical Sciences in Iran. 

Researches conducting the study asked 82 healthy, but overweight women to go on a weight-loss programme. 

He explained: “The women didn’t normally finish their evening meals until well after 10pm, but now half were asked to finish their eating by 7.30pm at the latest. 

“After 12 weeks both groups had lost weight, but those who changed to eating earlier in the evening had lost an average of 15lb, compared with less than 11lb for the late eaters. 

“In other words, just by changing the time they ate the early eaters had shed an extra 4lb. 

“They also lost an extra inch around the waist and experienced greater improvements in their cholesterol and blood fats,” the diet expert added. 

Dr Michael said it wasn’t because the later-eating group consumed more, because the two groups had roughly the same calorie intake. 

Instead, he said researchers think that amongst other things, eating later at night can affect the genres that control your body lock, thus leading to a greater risk of obesity and type 2 diabetes. 

The nutritionist continued in his Daily Mail article: “Further proof that late-night eating really does alter your ability to handle food comes from a recent study by Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in the U.S. 

“[It] which found that when healthy volunteers had their dinner within an hour of going to bed, they burnt 10 percent less fat overnight than when they stopped eating three hours before shut-eye.” 

He added that bodies don’t like having to deal with lots of food late at night, suggesting a “midnight snack will have a worse impact” than the same food eaten earlier in the day. 

Dr Michael Mosley’s chocolate and beetroot brownie recipe 

Ingredients:

100g coconut oil, plus extra for greasing

275g cooked beetroot, drained and cut into small chunks

Three large eggs

60g cocoa powder

100g soft pitted dates

100g wholemeal self-raising flour

One tsp ground cinnamon

One tsp bicarbonate of soda

75g plain dark chocolate (around 85% cocoa solids), roughly chopped

Method:

1. Preheat the oven to 200C. Grease and line the base and sides of a 20cm loose-based square cake tin with non-stick baking paper.

2. Place the beetroot, eggs, cocoa powder, dates and coconut oil in a food processor and blend until thoroughly combined. You can also blend the ingredients together in a bowl using a stick blender.

3. Add the flour, cinnamon, a pinch of sea salt and the bicarbonate of soda and blend until well combined. Add an extra tablespoon water to loosen the mixture, if needed.

Stir in the chocolate, then spoon into the prepared tin, spreading to the sides. Bake for about 20 minutes, or until risen and just firm to the touch.

Step 4. Cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then turn out and cut into squares to serve.

Cook’s tips: If you use a pack of ready-cooked beetroot from the supermarket, make sure it doesn’t contain vinegar or spices. Otherwise, you can cook them yourself – wash the beetroot, place in a pan of water, bring to the boil and cook for 40-45 minutes, or until tender, then peel. Freeze leftover brownies in a lidded container, wrapped in foil.

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